More Opportunities to Learn

Anyone living in the Yorkshire area who’s interested in learning more about zooarchaeology but is unable to attend the University of Sheffield course (Understanding Zooarchaeology: A Short Course for Archaeology and Heritage Professionals and Enthusiasts) due to the commitment of the three-day full-time structure of the course may be interested in another course I’ll be leading this year.  Introduction to Zooarchaeology will run over ten weeks for two hours on Wednesday evenings beginning 10th October 2012 and will be based in the University of York’s Centre for Lifelong Learning.

Additionally, I’ll be leading another course which may be of interest to some people who have already studied on either of the courses mentioned above, as well people for whom zooarchaeology is not of any interest at all.  Introduction to Ethnoarchaeology will run over six weeks for two hours on Tuesday evenings beginning 22nd January 2013 and will also be based in the University of York’s Centre for Lifelong Learning.

Short outlines of both courses are provided below and anyone interested in finding out more about them is encouraged to contact me directly.

lion skeleton

www.zooarchaeology.co.uk

 

Introduction to Zooarchaeology

This course will introduce participants to the methods that can be used to gather information from archaeological animal bones and the relevance of these remains to wider archaeological and ecological study.

Designed for people with little or no experience in zooarchaeology, it is an ideal introduction to the field.  Through short lectures, discussions and hands on practical workshops, the course will give you practical experience of zooarchaeological methods, helping you to understand the archaeological potential and limitations of zooarchaeology.

Introduction to Ethnoarchaeology

This course will introduce participants to ethnographic analogy as a range of tools for archaeological research and interpretation.

Designed for people with little or no experience in ethnoarchaeology, it is an ideal introduction to the field for those with an interest in archaeology and/or ethnography and anthropology.  Through short lectures, discussions and workshops, the course will introduce ethnoarchaeological methods, helping you to understand the archaeological potential and limitations of ethnographic research in archaeology.

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